Books

Chesterton

from Midwest Book Review

There are seven members of the radical Central Anarchist Council who, for security purposes, name themselves after the days of the week – Sunday, Monday, etc. However, the turn of events soon cast doubt upon their true identities, for the man who was Thursday is not the impassioned young poet he pretends to be, but rather a member of Scotland Yard’s anti-terrorist squad of secret detectives. Who and what are the true identities of the other days of the week? Chesterton unwinds the mysterious entanglements in his own inventive and lively way and then escalates the mounting nightmare of paradox and surprise, culminating in a shocking revelation. He probes the mysteries of behavior and belief in an all too human world.

There are several versions of this novel available on amazon.com. The Penquin Classics edition is available used for as little as $4.49 here.

An annotated edition of the book is available here used for under $10.00. Concerning this annotated version, amazon.com states:

This edition of Chesterton’s masterpiece and most famous novel, The Man Who Was Thursday, explicates and enriches the complete text with extensive footnotes, together with an introductory essay on the metaphysical meaning of Chesterton’s profound allegory. Martin Gardner sees the novel’s anarchists as symbols of our God-given free will, and the mysterious Sunday as representing Nature, with its strange mixture of good and evil when considered as distinct from God, as a mask hiding the transcendental face of the creator. The book also includes a bibliography listing the novel’s many earlier editions and stage dramatizations, as well as numerous illustrations that further illuminate the text.

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